Category Archives: 7-Issues

this is the parent category of a number of actual issues such as:
environment; energy; gender rights; abortion; immigration, globalization; social justice; racism; prohibition; globalization; inequality etc.

What’s wrong with feminism #3

A few years ago, a female friend at a dinner party got seriously offended when I disagreed with her on something. She insisted that my disagreement is oppressive disrespect. She was wrong, she had no argument, but she insisted that we all accept her position on the subject because “she has the right to her opinion.” The situation was surreal, so I just tried to change the subject. She did not like that either. She wanted me to capitulate. That was third wave feminism in a nutshell.

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What’s wrong with feminism #2

The Joke

Is it that serious? Is it just a joke? Can it be both? Let’s see:

Feminism clearly encourages women to leave their husbands. 70% of divorce proceedings are initiated by women. Gloria Steinem formulated the attitude best when she said: “A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle.” As a result, marriage rates are down, especially in the lower socioeconomic strata.
We may think it is a joke, but it does represent the zeitgeist of a whole generation.
Killing their children? Roe vs. Wade was the defining cause of second wave feminism. There is something perverse watching the celebration after the Irish abortion law referendum.
I couldn’t take witchcraft seriously, but some feminists apparently can. Continue reading →

What’s wrong with feminism #1

As I was following a discussion on abortion that morphed into a debate about feminism, I could not resist chiming in with my standard mantra about the evils of cultural Marxism.

Naturally, I was asked: What’s wrong with feminism? It started with this statement:

“In our society, we have accepted the role of women in the workplace. That role/lifestyle/set of opportunities in life is/are made more possible by the woman having the same sexual freedom as men. Sexual mistakes happen. In order to “level the life playing field”, our society has provided ways for a woman to do just that. This does not mean she must/will never have children – just on her terms and in concert with a life partner of mutual choice. That’s an equal relationship. That is a cornerstone of our modern society.” Continue reading →

A heartfelt letter

This is not the post I promised you at the end of the last one. A sad news has changed my schedule.
I just learned that Dr. Horváth passed away on the 6th of May, age 80.
I meant this to be an open letter at the end of my series, not an obituary. A beginning of a conversation, not an end without a beginning. It is rather blunt, even by my own standards.

I could have changed it, but decided not to. This is how it was written. I wish we had a chance to have a conversation. As it is, all I can wish for him is to rest in peace and to posthumously find the recognition he richly deserved.  Continue reading →

A heartfelt Analysis

At the end of the second post of this series, I ‘absolved’ my doctors from responsibility. How arrogant of me! How do I dare to imply that they were responsible to begin with? Didn’t they just save my life? But if they are not responsible, then who is? I called my doctors the product of the system, but what does that mean? What is the system? What defines it as a ‘system’?   Continue reading →

A heartfelt story

Let me start with telling you just the story. Please bear with me, it will have some lessons in the end.
It is just another one of those personal to political, particular to general stories that – properly formulated – I believe all of our stories are.

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The immorality of unexamined compassion

I met a truly caring person at a dinner party, someone with the best of intentions and a militant attitude about her moral sensibilities. At times, I had the feeling that she was on a constant lookout for things I may say that she can get indignant about.
I had no doubt about her sincerity, I had no doubt that her heart was in the right place.
On whatever subject we discussed, I had no doubt that she took the position she did because she considered it to be the most moral position available. It was clear from her attitude that she would consider any alternative position not just wrong, but outright immoral.
I found myself, as at many other times talking to left-wingers, in front of a dilemma: which aspect should I address: reason or morality? Logic or emotions? How can I step back to talk about the underlying problem, the fact that compassion, feelings and good intentions are NOT moral if the actions they lead to do more harm than good?
The morality of our actions should only be judged by their results, not by the intentions motivating them. All too often, the left uses its good intentions as an excuse to explain away the harm they do.

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Vexing questions about taxing

2016-10-28-us-spending-percent-of-gdp-history

I asked an avowedly apolitical friend, who lives and works in a circle of leftists, whether any of the friends I met through her expressed disapproval of my politics to the extent of trying to avoid my company. She said no, but one of the friends told her that he would rather avoid talking to me about taxation in particular because he finds the immorality of the libertarian position on taxation very upsetting and worries that he cannot keep his cool and civility talking about it.

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The failure of fuzzy opining

2016-06-07 Another epic fail-01

The following item was part of my daily dose of the Economist this Tuesday the 7th of June:

Class action: China’s university entrance

The 9.4m teenagers taking the two-day exam which starts today have been cramming for years. The tests, known as the gaokao, will (they believe) determine their entire future. Meritocratic exams have been revered in China since imperial times, when any man could sit them to enter the civil service. For centuries they enabled the poor but talented to rise to high office. The gaokao is intended similarly to be a great leveller. But China’s education system is becoming more unfair. The number of university students has increased nearly sevenfold since 1998, but the expanded intake has mostly been from cities, whereas 90% of rural youths leave school at 15 or younger. As a result the country is increasingly divided between those with degrees and those who never even make it to senior high school. Give China’s rulers a failing grade on that test.

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