“Scientific” gender diversity

2016-05-04 half-man-half-woman-2-300x2882-288x276

I had a conversation with a couple of scientists a few months ago that I still cannot get over.
They are both biologists by training. She left the field of scientific research decades ago, but he is a world renown geneticist, head of a research lab. They are both, also, left-liberals.

The subject was transgender. I expressed my concern about the denial of reality it represents and about pushing the idea to children at an ever younger and more impressionable age. They both jumped on me.
You don’t understand! Gender is a wide spectrum. There are sixteen genders on a scale where male and female are just the two end-points. What are they? I asked. Well, you know about hermaphrodites, don’t you? Yes, I said, and I also know about Siamese twins and people who think that they are Napoleon.
The conversation never got better. I was hammered with the radical leftist gender-bender propaganda. No evidence, just the usual leftists appeal to generally accepted knowledge. The “everybody knows that” (therefore you should accept it without critical comments) line.

I was shocked. These were not just scientists, whom I could expect to have some critical thinking faculties, but biologists whom I could reasonably expect to be able to tell the difference between a biological and a psychological condition. We left our disagreements unresolved, but I was determined to look into it, especially into the number. Why sixteen? What are those sixteen genders? What is the biological criteria to identify them? Who came up with it? Where is the literature on it? Why didn’t I hear about it before? If it is real, it must be a revolutionary discovery.

I could not find ANY reference for the quoted sixteen genders. I found 58 on Facebook and I found 63 on a ‘pagan wisdom’ page.
The best page I found on the subject (trying to understand and describe the subculture) goes into great lengths explaining the conflicting theories and ideologies. The only thing that is worthy of noticing about it, however, is that the writer is a sociologist. Not a medical doctor or a psychiatrist.
Sex is biological, gender is psychological, social and political. Sex is in your genes (and there is only two of them) gender is in your mind and when it comes to your mind, anything goes. How many genders are there? As many as you can bullshit into existence. The foundation of transgender theories is conjured reality. It has nothing to do with the real world, but hey, anything goes if you can get away with it. Just look at the lists linked above.

Then I came across this highly recommended presentation on the subject giving me the final push to write this post. I urge you to watch it and consider the evidence. I don’t think that it is too difficult to understand. I expressed similar opinions in my own posts (Let’s be careful what we wish for and Why it matters) coming to the same conclusion based on simple common sense.

I don’t want to repeat the arguments here; neither mine nor Black Pigeon’s, as my concern (and the point of this post) is not the issue, but the mindset of my friends. Still, to address the point, I need to sum up the results of my admittedly limited research.

  • There are only two biological sexes. This biological reality cannot be changed as it is coded into every cell in our body.
  • The only science behind ‘transgenderism’ is psychiatry, which identifies it as a treatable mental illness called Gender Dysphoria.
  • Occasional successes of gender reassignment surgery non-withstanding, entertaining and encouraging this mental condition is generally harmful.
  • Encouraging gender dysphoria instead of treating it is irresponsible.
  • Doing it to children is even more so.

The only reason we are talking about it is politics, most particularly the politics of the left looking for new frontiers to conquer, new ‘rights’ to fight for, new constituents to represent, new subjects for their benevolent condescension. Framing it as another human rights struggle, the left is using this subject to further advance post-modernist cultural relativism; the idea that politics can (and should) define reality.

I would expect my biologist friends to understand that, but apparently they don’t. This makes me wonder what prevents them from using a little common sense or the sort of critical thinking one would expect from scientists? The only answer I can suggest is POLITICS. The need to fit in. The comfort of going with the intellectual zeitgeist. Not to stick out. To conform. To show their loyalties.
The question then would become how far would they be willing to go supporting some nonsense in their effort to stay faithful to their politics. How much difference does it make how close the object of the political fashion is to their field of expertise? Would that make their support for the idea stronger or weaker? How much integrity is there in science?
Considering the science of climate change, the prospect of the virtuous answer is not very promising. The scientific opinion in that field is also divided more or less along political lines.

The scientist of the field of gender dysphoria are also divided. On the one hand, you have people like Dr. Paul R. McHugh who said that:

“……. sex changes were “biologically impossible” and that those doctors who “promote sexual reassignment surgery are collaborating with and promoting a mental disorder.
[….] that transgender surgery is not the solution for people who suffer a “disorder of ‘assumption’”
[….] In support of his opinion, he pointed to a recent study which showed that the suicide rate among “transgendered” people who had reassignment surgery is 20 times higher than the suicide rate among normal people.”

On the other hand, there are organization such as the  Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association (recently renamed to WPATH) which is creating guidelines for “The Standards Of Care For Gender Identity Disorders

The division is clearly political. One side recognizes the problem and tries to treat the mental disorder, while the other is trying to change reality to match the delusion. A very communist attitude.
The quote on Marx’s grave is:

“The philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways;
the point is to change it.”

Ever since Marx, and especially since the spread of postmodernist cultural relativism, the leftist attitude is “Damn reality! We will make it what we want it to be. Whatever the harm, whatever the costs, whatever the consequences may be.”
The consequences in this case, as is the case with most leftist causes, are generally harmful, but ideology trumps reality.

When it comes to my friends, I have two options. I can either believe that they don’t understand what they are talking about or that they don’t care. I chose to believe the later. I don’t think that they are stupid, I think that they are corrupt. Not any more than a typical leftist, but that is bad enough. I understand that one needs to fit in to survive in any environment, but at some point you must face the questions:

How far are you willing to go? How many compromises are you willing to make? How much harm are you willing to tolerate before it matters more than the moral swamp of your conformity?

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

As for you, you also have two choices. You may waste your time with reading the following to come to the conclusions above, or you may be just very grateful that I did the time wasting on your behalf.

 

References:

Article in the New Observer about Transgender as a mental illness

Transgender Surgery Isn’t the Solution
Why Caitlyn Jenner represents a new type of American hero
The successful treatment of a gender dysphoric patient with pimozide

Another alarming study:

PLOS ONE- Long-Term Follow-Up of Transsexual Persons Undergoing Sex Reassignment Surgery- Cohort Study in Sweden
Gender Ideology Harms Children
Sex change regrets, a site with heartbreaking stories

Gender ideology harms children.
Paul R. McHugh
Research from the US and Holland suggests that up to a fifth (20%) of patients regret changing sex.

 

WPATH – World Professional Association for Transgender Health

How Many Sexes- How Many Genders- When Two Are Not Enough

Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Assoication, Inc-
Here’s a List of 58 Gender Options for Facebook Users – ABC News
A series of articles in Marie Clair magazine
Transgender Issues in 2015 – Transitioning Info and FAQs – Marie Claire
This is part of the above series:
Facts and Statistics About Transgender People – Transitioning Numbers
8 critical facts about the state of transgender America- – The Washington Post
Microsoft Word – Trans PULSE- Statistics Relevant for Human Rights Policy June 2015.docx
5 Shocking Facts About Transgender Suicide And Violence That You Need To Know – Bustle
The Queer Community Has to Stop Being Transphobic- Realizing My Cisgender Privilege

My own posts on the subject:
Let’s be careful what we wish for
Why it matters
Gender(less) politics

 

There are further links in the Black Pigeon Speaks video.

This is the link to the references in the video

7 replies on ““Scientific” gender diversity”

  1. I think (or a more accurate term is feel, because I have no proof of this) that we are very close to the tipping point, or rather the point of no return. The last time ideology was so fervently activist and had taken over so much of society(all the while redefining science, history and sociology) we ended up with Nazi Germany, World War Two and, by the end of it, a world in ruin where one half got too tired to fight and just turned their backs on the other half which they left drowning in down a well for the following 45 years. My guess is the trigger this time around will be the US presidential election. I percieved the acceleration of this ideological push in tight correlation with Obama’s term winding down.

  2. zorkthehun says:

    Another interesting e-mail exchange:
    Hi Zork,
    I want to comment on this one. Just so you understand, I am not addressing the political or social issues, I just want to address the issue from a scientific perspective.
    Hermaphroditism or ovotesticular disorder of sex development is a medically known condition. The individual is born with ambiguous external genetalia but the reproductive organs of a female. In puberty the individual will grow breasts but may still produce sperm. This is rare in humans (not in plants and animals) . In true gonadal intersex the individual has both ovarian and testicular tissue (xy and xx chromosomes). There are also various abnormalities of the xx xy chromosomes such as a male having xxy or a deformity of the x or the y. These are scientific facts.
    This leads me to believe that there is of course a normal male and a normal female but there is a spectrum of conditions in between.
    Love, R.

    my reply:
    Thank you for the points.
    You are not the first one to make them. They are important enough to dedicate my next post to answering them.
    The essence of my point is that no matter how true these arguments are, they do not change the underlying questions which are:
    • how far should we go in our attempts to change a ‘mistake of nature’
    • are pretend changes really helpful
    and
    • how much role politics should play in the decisions
    …and so on
    ……. But I will expand on these in the post
    The only thing I want you to consider for now, is that every single example you mentioned is an aberration. A Mutation. Even you describe them as ‘abnormalities.’
    Serious medical conditions preventing their victims from properly functioning as either male or female. There is no such thing as a properly functioning transsexual.
    Biological abnormalities should be cured, if possible, not entertained, encouraged and even celebrated as some wonderful new frontier of human existence.

  3. zorkthehun says:

    …. and a more involved one with a lot of references.
    I will address it in my next post.

    Hi Zork, sure you have tried your best on the gender issue. This blog is, however, not your best. You might want to educate yourself more to ensure of not falling into dogmatism and to see this issue through peer reviewed medical science publications.
    Here is a short and far from complete list of few, recent publications on gender dysphoria in PubMed. (The copy paste messed up the list (sorry!) but the doi number or the title may help you to find the publications (at least the abstracts)).
    Use PubMed

    A. (from Melbourne)

    [Assessment and management of gender dysphoria in children and adolescents]. (2016). [Assessment and management of gender dysphoria in children and adolescents]. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.arcped.2016.03.002
    [Care of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria in the context of an interdisciplinary special consultation service]. (2014). [Care of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria in the context of an interdisciplinary special consultation service]., 63(6), 465–485.
    [Characteristics of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria referred to the Hamburg Gender Identity Clinic]. (2014). [Characteristics of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria referred to the Hamburg Gender Identity Clinic]., 63(6), 486–509.
    [Clinical treatment of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria from international experts’ point of view]. (2014). [Clinical treatment of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria from international experts’ point of view]., 63(6), 449–464.
    [Gender dysphoria and transsexualism. Psychiatric aspects]. (1990). [Gender dysphoria and transsexualism. Psychiatric aspects]., 148(9), 775–781.
    [Gender dysphoria in adolescents: difficulties in treatment]. (2014). [Gender dysphoria in adolescents: difficulties in treatment]., 63(6), 510–522.
    [Gender dysphoria in children and adolescents – treatment guidelines and follow-up study]. (2015). [Gender dysphoria in children and adolescents – treatment guidelines and follow-up study]., 43(1), 47–55. http://doi.org/10.1024/1422-4917/a000332
    [Gender dysphoria in children and adolescents]. (2014). [Gender dysphoria in children and adolescents]., 63(6), 431–436.
    [Gender dysphoria in pervasive developmental disorders]. (2011). [Gender dysphoria in pervasive developmental disorders]., 113(12), 1173–1183.
    [Legal aspects and the treatment procedure of gender dysphoria in Hungary]. (2015). [Legal aspects and the treatment procedure of gender dysphoria in Hungary]., 156(30), 1214–1220. http://doi.org/10.1556/650.2015.30211
    [Transgender, transsexualism and gender dysphoria: current developments in diagnostics and health care]. (2014). [Transgender, transsexualism and gender dysphoria: current developments in diagnostics and health care]., 64(6), 232–245. http://doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1336970
    A further assessment of Blanchard’s typology of homosexual versus non-homosexual or autogynephilic gender dysphoria. (2011). A further assessment of Blanchard’s typology of homosexual versus non-homosexual or autogynephilic gender dysphoria., 40(2), 247–257. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-009-9579-2
    A network analysis of body satisfaction of people with gender dysphoria. (2016). A network analysis of body satisfaction of people with gender dysphoria., 17, 184–190. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2016.04.002
    A new perspective on gender dysphoria and repetitive sex reassignment surgeries: a case report. (2014). A new perspective on gender dysphoria and repetitive sex reassignment surgeries: a case report., 16(2). http://doi.org/10.4088/PCC.13l01608
    A Rare Case of Male-to-Eunuch Gender Dysphoria. (2015). A Rare Case of Male-to-Eunuch Gender Dysphoria., 3(4), 331–333. http://doi.org/10.1002/sm2.81
    A review of clinical approaches to gender dysphoria. (1990). A review of clinical approaches to gender dysphoria., 51(2), 57–64.
    A review of the physical and metabolic effects of cross-sex hormonal therapy in the treatment of gender dysphoria. (2016). A review of the physical and metabolic effects of cross-sex hormonal therapy in the treatment of gender dysphoria., 53(Pt 1), 10–20. http://doi.org/10.1177/0004563215587763
    Adolescents with gender dysphoria. (2015). Adolescents with gender dysphoria., 29(3), 485–495. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.beem.2015.01.004
    Affective temperaments in subjects with female-to-male gender dysphoria. (2015). Affective temperaments in subjects with female-to-male gender dysphoria., 176, 61–64. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2015.02.001
    Alcohol involvement and dysphoria: a longitudinal examination of gender differences from late adolescence to adulthood. (2001). Alcohol involvement and dysphoria: a longitudinal examination of gender differences from late adolescence to adulthood., 15(3), 227–236.
    Anatomic variation of the corpus callosum in persons with gender dysphoria. (1991). Anatomic variation of the corpus callosum in persons with gender dysphoria., 20(4), 409–417.
    Anorexia nervosa and gender dysphoria in two adolescents. (2015). Anorexia nervosa and gender dysphoria in two adolescents., 48(1), 151–155. http://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22368
    Approach to Children and Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria. (2016). Approach to Children and Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria., 37(3), 89–98. http://doi.org/10.1542/pir.2015-0032
    Assessing patient satisfaction with a multidisciplinary gender dysphoria clinic in Melbourne. (2015). Assessing patient satisfaction with a multidisciplinary gender dysphoria clinic in Melbourne., 23(2), 158–162. http://doi.org/10.1177/1039856214566829
    Australian children living with gender dysphoria: does the Family Court have a role to play? Australian children living with gender dysphoria: does the Family Court have a role to play? (September 2014).
    Baseline Physiologic and Psychosocial Characteristics of Transgender Youth Seeking Care for Gender Dysphoria. (2015). Baseline Physiologic and Psychosocial Characteristics of Transgender Youth Seeking Care for Gender Dysphoria., 57(4), 374–380. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.04.027
    BDNF: a biomarker for social vulnerability in individuals diagnosed with gender dysphoria. (2014). BDNF: a biomarker for social vulnerability in individuals diagnosed with gender dysphoria., 50, 16–17. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.11.009
    Being open about my gender dysphoria led to serious abuse. (2015). Being open about my gender dysphoria led to serious abuse., 29(28), 32–33. http://doi.org/10.7748/ns.29.28.32.s39
    Body image in persons with gender dysphoria. (2015). Body image in persons with gender dysphoria., 15(4), e6138.
    Body Satisfaction and Physical Appearance in Gender Dysphoria. (2016). Body Satisfaction and Physical Appearance in Gender Dysphoria., 45(3), 575–585. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-015-0614-1
    Bone mass in young adulthood following gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog treatment and cross-sex hormone treatment in adolescents with gender dysphoria. (2015). Bone mass in young adulthood following gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog treatment and cross-sex hormone treatment in adolescents with gender dysphoria., 100(2), E270–5. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2014-2439
    Brief Report: Autistic Features in Children and Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria. (2015). Brief Report: Autistic Features in Children and Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria., 45(8), 2628–2632. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2413-x
    Characteristics of Referrals for Gender Dysphoria Over a 13-Year Period. (2016). Characteristics of Referrals for Gender Dysphoria Over a 13-Year Period., 58(3), 369–371. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.11.010
    Classifying Intersex in DSM-5: Critical Reflections on Gender Dysphoria. (2015). Classifying Intersex in DSM-5: Critical Reflections on Gender Dysphoria., 44(5), 1147–1163. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-015-0550-0
    Clinical management of gender dysphoria in children and adolescents: the Dutch approach. (2012). Clinical management of gender dysphoria in children and adolescents: the Dutch approach., 59(3), 301–320. http://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2012.653300
    Clinical management of youth with gender dysphoria in Vancouver. (2014). Clinical management of youth with gender dysphoria in Vancouver., 164(4), 906–911. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.10.068
    Commentary on Kraus’ (2015) “classifying intersex in DSM-5: critical reflections on gender dysphoria”. (2015). Commentary on Kraus’ (2015) “classifying intersex in DSM-5: critical reflections on gender dysphoria”., 44(7), 1737–1740. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-015-0586-1
    Comments on differences of gender dysphoria between children and teenagers. (2015). Comments on differences of gender dysphoria between children and teenagers. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.rpsm.2015.07.001
    Comorbid Gender Dysphoria in a Preadolescent Boy With Fragile X Syndrome. (2016). Comorbid Gender Dysphoria in a Preadolescent Boy With Fragile X Syndrome., 45(4), 791–792. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-016-0710-x
    Comorbidity of gender dysphoria and other major psychiatric diagnoses. (1997). Comorbidity of gender dysphoria and other major psychiatric diagnoses., 26(1), 13–26.
    Comparing the validity of the self reporting questionnaire and the Afghan symptom checklist: dysphoria, aggression, and gender in transcultural assessment of mental health. (2014). Comparing the validity of the self reporting questionnaire and the Afghan symptom checklist: dysphoria, aggression, and gender in transcultural assessment of mental health., 14, 206. http://doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-14-206
    Concomitant psychiatric problems and hormonal treatment induced metabolic syndrome in gender dysphoria individuals: a 2 year follow-up study. (2015). Concomitant psychiatric problems and hormonal treatment induced metabolic syndrome in gender dysphoria individuals: a 2 year follow-up study., 78(4), 399–406. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.02.001
    Consecutive lynestrenol and cross-sex hormone treatment in biological female adolescents with gender dysphoria: a retrospective analysis. (2016). Consecutive lynestrenol and cross-sex hormone treatment in biological female adolescents with gender dysphoria: a retrospective analysis., 7, 14. http://doi.org/10.1186/s13293-016-0067-9
    Coping with dysphoria: gender differences in college students. (1990). Coping with dysphoria: gender differences in college students., 46(6), 896–899.
    Correlates of gender dysphoria in Taiwanese university students. (2010). Correlates of gender dysphoria in Taiwanese university students., 39(6), 1415–1428. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-009-9570-y
    Cross-sex hormonal treatment and body uneasiness in individuals with gender dysphoria. (2014). Cross-sex hormonal treatment and body uneasiness in individuals with gender dysphoria., 11(3), 709–719. http://doi.org/10.1111/jsm.12413
    Cross-sex hormone therapy for gender dysphoria. (2015). Cross-sex hormone therapy for gender dysphoria., 38(3), 269–282. http://doi.org/10.1007/s40618-014-0186-2
    Current and Future Direction of Gender Dysphoria and Gender Incongruence Research. (2015). Current and Future Direction of Gender Dysphoria and Gender Incongruence Research., 12(12), 2226–2228. http://doi.org/10.1111/jsm.13065
    Desisting and persisting gender dysphoria after childhood: a qualitative follow-up study. (2011). Desisting and persisting gender dysphoria after childhood: a qualitative follow-up study., 16(4), 499–516. http://doi.org/10.1177/1359104510378303
    Development of feminizing genitoplasty for gender dysphoria. (2007). Development of feminizing genitoplasty for gender dysphoria., 4(4 Pt 1), 981–989. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2007.00480.x
    Difficulties inherent in certifying people with gender dysphoria. (1999). Difficulties inherent in certifying people with gender dysphoria., 70(4), 338–339.
    Dissociative symptoms in individuals with gender dysphoria: is the elevated prevalence real? (2015). Dissociative symptoms in individuals with gender dysphoria: is the elevated prevalence real?, 226(1), 173–180. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.12.045
    Do children with gender dysphoria have intense/obsessional interests? (2015). Do children with gender dysphoria have intense/obsessional interests?, 52(2), 213–219. http://doi.org/10.1080/00224499.2013.860073
    Doctors are failing to help people with gender dysphoria. (2016). Doctors are failing to help people with gender dysphoria., 352, i1694.
    DSM-5: call for commentaries on gender dysphoria, sexual dysfunctions, and paraphilic disorders. (2013). DSM-5: call for commentaries on gender dysphoria, sexual dysfunctions, and paraphilic disorders., 42(5), 669–674. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-013-0148-3
    Early Medical Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Gender Dysphoria: An Empirical Ethical Study. (2015). Early Medical Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Gender Dysphoria: An Empirical Ethical Study., 57(4), 367–373. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.04.004
    Effects of treating gender dysphoria and anorexia nervosa in a transgender adolescent: Lessons learned. (2015). Effects of treating gender dysphoria and anorexia nervosa in a transgender adolescent: Lessons learned., 48(7), 942–945. http://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22438
    Ethics, morality, and pediatric gender dysphoria. (2014). Ethics, morality, and pediatric gender dysphoria., 14(1), 50–51. http://doi.org/10.1080/15265161.2014.862411
    Evaluation of Asperger Syndrome in Youth Presenting to a Gender Dysphoria Clinic. (2015). Evaluation of Asperger Syndrome in Youth Presenting to a Gender Dysphoria Clinic. http://doi.org/10.1089/lgbt.2015.0070
    Evidence for an altered sex ratio in clinic-referred adolescents with gender dysphoria. (2015). Evidence for an altered sex ratio in clinic-referred adolescents with gender dysphoria., 12(3), 756–763. http://doi.org/10.1111/jsm.12817
    Factors associated with desistence and persistence of childhood gender dysphoria: a quantitative follow-up study. (2013). Factors associated with desistence and persistence of childhood gender dysphoria: a quantitative follow-up study., 52(6), 582–590. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2013.03.016
    Falling through the cracks. Health insurance policies increasingly include coverage for treatments related to gender dysphoria, but gaps remain. (2013). Falling through the cracks. Health insurance policies increasingly include coverage for treatments related to gender dysphoria, but gaps remain., 96(8), 18–22.
    Family cooccurrence of “gender dysphoria”: ten sibling or parent-child pairs. (2000). Family cooccurrence of “gender dysphoria”: ten sibling or parent-child pairs., 29(5), 499–507.
    Gender assignment dysphoria in the DSM-5. (2014). Gender assignment dysphoria in the DSM-5., 43(7), 1263–1266. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-013-0249-z
    Gender dysphoria – prevalence and co-morbidities in an irish adult population. (2014). Gender dysphoria – prevalence and co-morbidities in an irish adult population., 5, 87. http://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2014.00087
    Gender dysphoria and autism spectrum disorder: A narrative review. (2016). Gender dysphoria and autism spectrum disorder: A narrative review., 28(1), 70–80. http://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2015.1111199
    Gender Dysphoria and Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Note of Caution. (2016). Gender Dysphoria and Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Note of Caution., 3(2), 175. http://doi.org/10.1089/lgbt.2015.0138
    Gender dysphoria and children. (2014). Gender dysphoria and children., 52(8), 27–30. http://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20140625-01
    Gender Dysphoria and Co-Occurring Autism Spectrum Disorders: Review, Case Examples, and Treatment Considerations. (2014). Gender Dysphoria and Co-Occurring Autism Spectrum Disorders: Review, Case Examples, and Treatment Considerations., 1(4), 277–282. http://doi.org/10.1089/lgbt.2013.0045
    Gender dysphoria and cross-dressing in people with intellectual disability: a literature review. (2006). Gender dysphoria and cross-dressing in people with intellectual disability: a literature review., 44(4), 260–271. http://doi.org/10.1352/0047-6765(2006)44%5B260:GDACIP%5D2.0.CO;2
    Gender dysphoria and gender change in an adolescent with 45,X/46,XY mixed gonadal dysgenesis. (2009). Gender dysphoria and gender change in an adolescent with 45,X/46,XY mixed gonadal dysgenesis., 117(6), 301–304. http://doi.org/10.1055/s-0028-1085999
    Gender dysphoria and gender change in androgen insensitivity or micropenis. (2005). Gender dysphoria and gender change in androgen insensitivity or micropenis., 34(4), 411–421. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-005-4341-x
    Gender dysphoria and gender change in chromosomal females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. (2005). Gender dysphoria and gender change in chromosomal females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia., 34(4), 389–397. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-005-4338-5
    Gender Dysphoria and Gender Incongruence: An evolving inter-disciplinary field. (2016). Gender Dysphoria and Gender Incongruence: An evolving inter-disciplinary field., 28(1), 1–4. http://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2016.1125740
    Gender dysphoria and sexual abuse: a case report. (1990). Gender dysphoria and sexual abuse: a case report., 14(2), 281–283.
    Gender dysphoria associated with disorders of sex development. (2012). Gender dysphoria associated with disorders of sex development., 9(11), 620–627. http://doi.org/10.1038/nrurol.2012.182
    Gender Dysphoria in 46,XX Persons with Adrenogenital Syndrome Raised as Females: An Addendum. (2014). Gender Dysphoria in 46,XX Persons with Adrenogenital Syndrome Raised as Females: An Addendum., 2, 140. http://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2014.00140
    Gender dysphoria in a 39-year-old man. (2014). Gender dysphoria in a 39-year-old man., 186(1), 49–50. http://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.130450
    Gender dysphoria in adolescence. (2016). Gender dysphoria in adolescence., 28(1), 21–35. http://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2015.1124844
    Gender Dysphoria in Adults. (2016). Gender Dysphoria in Adults., 12, 217–247. http://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-021815-093034
    Gender dysphoria in Asperger’s syndrome: a caution. (2014). Gender dysphoria in Asperger’s syndrome: a caution., 22(1), 84–85. http://doi.org/10.1177/1039856213497814
    Gender dysphoria in childhood. (2016). Gender dysphoria in childhood., 28(1), 13–20. http://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2015.1115754
    Gender dysphoria in children and adolescents: a review of recent research. (2015). Gender dysphoria in children and adolescents: a review of recent research., 28(6), 430–434. http://doi.org/10.1097/YCO.0000000000000203
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    • zorkthehun says:

      ….and my reply to the above:
      No, András, I did not try my best. But I will next time.
      You are not the first to point out whatever you (and they) were trying to point out.

      If I failed, I failed at getting the point across, as neither you, nor the other commenters seem to have got it.
      I will give it another try, taking as much into account as I reasonably can from your rather extensive list.
      …………..for which I would like to thank you.
      ==================
      Sent: May 14, 2016 9:44 AM
      Hi Zork,
      I was happy to hear that you agreed with the “it was not your best” comment and you are planning to do a better job on the issue. Probably the best approach is not to have a “point” before enough is learnt. Otherwise there is a risk that the existing “point” biases the information gathering (what the politicians are always doing to get their point across). 
      Let me know if i could help,
      A.
      = = = = = = =
      On 18 May 2016, Zork G. Hun wrote:
      Hi András,
      What I actually said was that “I didn’t try my best”. It’s a different statement. The issue is just not important enough for me to really care about.
      What I DO care about is irrationality. But I am not happy about my last post either.
      The problem with it is that a serious look at just about any subject exposes new problems. The real point of this post is not just how F!@#ed up the science is, but how politics is the most likely contributor to the sorry state it’s in. I cannot even ask all the questions let alone discuss the answers in a single post. I feel that I am dragged into something that I really do not care much about. I don’t give a sh*t about sexual deviants, the only reason I am talking about it is the toxic politics surrounding it.
      In any case: If you feel that I was a little harsh on you in the post, it’s not personal.
      As for your generous offer, yes you can help. I don’t need another 150 useless links, but I would appreciate just ONE link to a decent, unbiased research project trying to find answers along the lines I defined in the post.
      My contention is that you will not find any.
      ….and maybe, at some point, we can sit down to discuss it again, giving it a serious and honest try this time.
      Zork G. Hun
      ===================================== =
      From: A. N. (@gmail.com]
      Sent: May 18, 2016 3:18 AM
      Oh well, Zork, I admire many things you do in one hand, On the other hand, I see many problems, which is blocking you to have an impact with your talent.
      Here are the problems, If you are interested in what I think – scrolled down. If not, stop reading here and trash this email.
      V
      .
      V
      1. You have your point first and then you collect support for it and not other way around. I mean, you should have your point generated when you learn as much as possible about something that you are really interested in. Then you develop a view, an integration, opinion, point (whatever you name it) that you share with the others. It is still not going to be the truth but your private opinion. Even you could indicate that your opinion is relative by saying: “ at the current stage of my knowledge i think …”. It would also give you the flexibility to say totally the opposite if new information gets into the picture, which may contradict with your previous conclusion/point.
      2. You are arrogant, which feature places you closer to Trump than to Einstein. This is not a good image in the eyes of non-republican Americans and anyone outside of that group of people. Trust me, science is not f!@#ed up! It provides the only way to understand the complexity of life; the biological, technical, economical, social, psychological, etc. Science could be abused (it happened in history) but that part is insignificant compared to the global, massive positive effect on human life. It is not easy though to think in the science way. It is an uncertain feeling, when you know that you cannot be right, what you think is not the truth, but models with creating predictive value only. Then you have to be ready (as I wrote above) to think and say the total opposite that you said yesterday (although this is a strength and not a weakness).
      3. There is no “ONE link”. There are research papers reporting on experiments and results, and there are reviews telling a synthesis of 10-100 research papers interpreted by the review writer. If you decide not follow somebody’s interpretation, you have to read those 150 “useless” links. I prefer the latter and then I can write a review myself.
      I am not sure, if 1-3 makes sense to you but it might not even matter, if good wine, food and women around.

      • zorkthehun says:

        Well, András, a little less condescension would help.

        I am very much interested in what you think, the problem is that I still don’t know what you think, because so far you did not answer ANY of the arguments that I made or questions that I raised. I am also a little puzzled why would you think that I am not interested. I am never the one who walks away from a discussion.
        A discussion, btw, that we are not really having. I ask questions, you talk about something else.

        At the end of this I will try one last time to make the questions as clear as I possibly can. Let’s see whether you have what it takes to answer them. As for your last mail:

        1. A blog is not a peer reviewed scientific study. I write opinion pieces. Yes, I always start with a point I want to make. If there is no point to make, there is no point writing. Yes, I provide references to illustrate my points and to show that I am not inventing anything.
        I do have an open mind for convincing arguments, and when I am presented with one, I ALWAYS make it public. I know how science is supposed to work and I still don’t understand how is it possible that you still don’t understand that this is where my problem is. That the science we are talking about is very bad science. I don’t care how many peers reviewed it.

        2. Arrogance is in the mind of the perceiver. You think I am arrogant, I (may) think that you are. We can exchange examples and explanations. I think, for example, that handing someone an unchecked list of a search’s result is arrogance. I spent the better half of a day going through every single link you provided. Where the hyperlink was missing, I googled the title. When I say they are useless, that is an assessment, not a dismissal. None of them represented a relevant argument to any of the point I made or questions I raised. This is part of my problem.
        I did not say that science as such is F!@#ed up, I said ‘the’ science, referring to this particular narrow branch of it that we are discussing. This particular field is seriously f!@#ed up because it is hopelessly corrupted by politics and dogmatic ideology. THAT WAS THE POINT OF MY LAST TWO POSTS! A point that you are still not ready to address. I have tremendous respect for science and I think that only a few branches have been corrupted. Social, medical and environmental sciences come to mind. The cause of the problems in every case is politics and/or money. The article in Nature says basically the same thing.

        3. Here is another thing you did not seem get: I did not ask for ONE document, I challenged you to show me AT LEAST one. ANY. I am not looking for the ultimate answer, I am looking for any that we can call scientific, for which I provided a fairly lose set of criteria in the post. By all means, send me a hundred, but I still contend that you will not find any. And again: I DID follow the links. Every single one of them. They are mostly abstracts, but those abstracts were good enough to determine the basic ideas and likely value of the articles. I am more than willing to go through every single one of them to demonstrate. As an alternative, you can quote the three that you consider the MOST scientific and I will show you where they fall short.

        The reason I am so late to respond is that I tried to incorporate this answer in a post but then I decided against because it turned it too unwieldy.

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